The Highschooler’s Guide to the 2020 Democratic Candidates (Part Two)

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The Highschooler’s Guide to the 2020 Democratic Candidates (Part Two)

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This is Part Two. For the first five candidates, make sure to check out Part One

All Candidates
NBC/WSJ Polls
#1 – Joe Biden (31%)
#2 – Elizabeth Warren (25%)
#3 – Bernie Sanders(14%)
#4 – Peter Buttigieg (7%)
#5 – Kamala Harris (5%)
#6 – Andrew Yang (4%)
#7 – Amy Klobuchar (2%)
#8 – Cory Booker (2%)
#9 – Beto O’Rourke (1%)
#15 – Julian Castro (1%)

To help distinguish between the 2020 Democratic Candidates, below is a list of the remaining major democratic candidates, alongside a summary of their key political stances.

Amy Klobuchar

Amy Klobuchar is a candidate that has based her campaign on moderation and bipartisanship. She has pitched herself as someone who can work across the aisle to get things done and settle tensions in both major political parties. One specific stance that Klobuchar has highlighted is her intent to fight the opioid crisis and major pharmaceutical companies, as well as to decrease prescription drug prices across the board. Another unique characteristic of her campaign is her plan to support agricultural and rural communities across the US.

Beto O’Rourke

  • Ninth in NBC/WSJ Polls (1%)
  • Former Representative from Texas
  • 46 Years Old
  • “Beto for America, Beto for All”
  • https://betoorourke.com/

Beto O’Rourke’s policies have been especially relevant for a democrat from the historically red state of Texas, concentrating on immigration and, even more so over the past weeks, gun control. His stance on gun control has been brought to the forefront of his campaign in the light of the recent gun violence in his hometown, with O’Rourke controversially supporting a mandatory buyback system of all assault rifles. Recent gun issues have provoked expletive-laden interviews from O’Rourke, increasing support among his fanbase and creating a more personal, human image, but also furthering some potential supporters with the controversy.

Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders isn’t a stranger to the Democratic Primaries. After losing the nomination to Hillary Clinton in 2016, Bernie is back with all of the same stances that made him famous: medicare for all, free public college, “cancelling” all student debt, and taking on “the billionaire class.” As a self-described “democratic socialist”, running for the democratic nomination despite being an independent candidate, Bernie has created a unique image for himself. However, his policies encompass more than just his stereotypical ideals. One particular trait is his push for equality and rights for Puerto Rico, Tribal Nations, and the disabled.

Elizabeth Warren

Elizabeth Warren’s large, detailed plans for restructuring the government and the economy have put her ahead of the pack in many ways. One specific policy is a new tax proposal that would annually tax 2% on the net worth of households worth over $50 million. Her core issues are “Ending Washington Corruption,” “Rebuilding the Middle Class,” “Strengthening Our Democracy,” “Equal Justice Under Law,” and “A Foreign Policy for All.” She has become known, along with Bernie Sanders, for being more progressive than their moderate opponent Joe Biden.

Andrew Yang

Andrew Yang has made it clear during every part of his campaign, from his emphasis of his entrepreneur background to his core issue, Universal Basic Income, that he is a very economically focused candidate. His three basic policies, “Humanity First,” “Medicare for All,” and “Human-Centered Capitalism,” are all based on the idea that a restructured financial system in the country is key for future success. Although being the most fiscally centered candidate, he is the only one opposed to a $15 minimum wage. Instead, Yang suggests the Freedom Dividend, a system that gives all American adults $1,000 every month. Another economic ideal of Yang’s campaign is that of protecting workers against growing automation.

 

To learn more about the candidates, make sure to watch the next debate. Every candidate in these articles, as well as candidates Tulsi Gabbard and Tom Steyer, will be debating in the CNN/New York Times debate in Westerville, Ohio, on Tuesday, October 15th.